Days 90-94: Impulse Problems & Energy Practical

This week we were back in-person after two weeks online.

Physics: Impulse Problems

A big theme I saw across my classes is that students had a pretty decent grasp of impulse, but didn’t think they had learned much the last two weeks. I kept thinking about my PhD research so far where, in some data I collected pre-pandemic, I found that even when students were mastering the material, they struggled to build confidence and self-efficacy from activities that were purely computer-based. In addition, right before we went online, my students also made clear that they really value discussion and collaboration as a way to learn physics, but I struggled to get students talking to each other online. With those things in mind, this week was all about giving students space and time for discussion and collaboration to build their confidence. We spent a lot of time whiteboarding various problems, including some that were assigned while we were online, so that students could talk to each other. I also gave much more feedback than usual while students were working on whiteboards to point out what they had correct or what they were doing well, which seemed to really help students see just how much they had learned the past two weeks.

AP Physics: Energy Practical

My students have been feeling pretty good about doing problems with conservation of energy, I think in part because we were able to start them in-person, then do a lot of practice while we were online. I wanted to give students something hands-on before we wrap up energy, so I got out the popper hopper toys and tasked students with finding the spring constant. To help my students with writing procedures, I had each group write a procedure on a whiteboard, then give it to another group to follow. They were allowed to go ask the group who’d written the procedure questions to clarify steps or discuss changes as both as a way to give feedback to the group who wrote the procedure and to ensure that every group was able to complete the task, even if there were issues with the procedure they were given. I think that helped give students a concrete target for what needs to be in a procedure.

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